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Major Scale Triad Inversions

[wpvideo y3IvNavP]
Following the C-A-G-E-D system positions (6 positions in total if you count open position up the octave as being “different” to open position) practice playing various harmonic material.
Here I play all diatonic C major scale triads in Root position, 1st inversion and 2nd inversion.
First I play Root position triads (1-3-5) starting with C major. I alternate up and down each triad for example:
(up) C major  (down) D minor  (up) E minor  (down) F major etc.
1st inversion triads (3-5-1) :
– Start on the lowest note in each position (in this position the lowest note is B)
– Start with a 1st inversion triad starting on B (in this case it must be G major)
2nd inversion triads (5-1-3)
– Again, start on the lowest note in each position (B in this case)
– The 2nd inversion triad starting on B (in the C major scale) is Em
Suggested Practice:
3.5 minutes on Root Position triads  x 6 positions = 21 minutes
3.5 minutes on 1st inversion triads  x 6 positions = 21 minutes
3.5 minutes on 2nd inversion triads  x 6 positions = 21 minutes
Total = 1 hour 3 min
 
For the PDF file that accompanies this video, please contact me via e-mail.

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Jean-Michel Pilc

Here is a series of clips from jazz pianist and educator Jean-Michel Pilc. He has been a faculty member at NYU since 2006. He has played with greats like Michael Brecker, Dave Liebman, Chris Potter and Richard Bona.
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwrbPXwow4Y]
In this short clip Pilc talks about the difference between playing what YOU hear vs the instrument playing YOU.
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fo71IYASARo]
Pilc has interesting views on music education.
I recently purchased his book It’s About Music: The Art and Heart of Improvisation” which Im currently still reading. Stay tuned for my review.
Here is an interview with Pilc talking about his book
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hrhFyRWi008]

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An evening with Paul Grabowsky

[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWfzaiUiRsQ]
I saw this on the ABC a few months ago. Paul is such an interesting guy and I loved this interview. Thanks Youtube for giving musicians access to so much educational material from all over the world.
For those that don’t know, Paul is one of Australia’a leading jazz musicians. Here is a link to his website.

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Mike League (Snarky Puppy) – Continuum

Mike league from Snarky Puppy (NY) plays an amazing version of Jaco’s “Continuum.” All on an ash/maple P bass too. check it out.
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMBGTDdbBfY]
I recently saw Snarky Puppy perform live as part of the 2013 Melbourne International Jazz Festival. It was an amazing performance from Mike and his band, full of uptempo funk grooves. This is a clip I found on youtube of Mike playing a really soulful version of Jaco’s “Continuum”. What I like the most about this version of “Continuum” is that it doesn’t sound like a “Jaco” cover. In my opinion Jaco’s music is so unique, so original, that it is hard to play his music without sounding at least a little bit like the man himself, even if its only a pale imitation.

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Steve Swallow solo transcription

Here is a transcription of Steve Swallow’s solo on “Someone To Watch Over Me” recorded live with the John Scofield Trio recorded in 2010
[youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MXGpNOW6bU0]
Click on this link Someone To Watch Over Me for my written transcription of Steve’s solo.
Key elements to analyse are:
– emphasis on outlining chord tones and harmonic movement
– development of key rhythmic and melodic motifs
– clear definition of rhythmic ideas
– constant articulation of every note
Swallow uses string bends in a sophisticated way to colour the underlying harmony, and his application of this technique is an extension of how it is applied in blues music. Dig how he uses string bends to anticipate the Db diminished and B diminished chords coupled with a repeated rhythmic phrase.
I recommend listening to Steve’s solo (without me playing over the top) to anyone wishing to learn and analyse this solo. The simplicity and beauty of this solo make it one of my favourite Steve Swallow solos. Here is the link to the Youtube clip.